Environment

Frequently Asked Questions

Eucalypt and the Fauna

The most important aspects to be considered regarding fauna are food diversity and favorable reproduction conditions. Despite the dry and unedible eucalypt fruit, the areas attract significant animal presence, mainly when native reserve areas are well distributed and enhanced during the plantation process or via adequate handling and multiple forest usage.

Eucalypt and Water

According to studies by important education and research institutes in Brazil, alike any vegetation, eucalypt needs water and nutrients in order to survive. However, comparisons among eucalypt species and other forest species demonstrate that it consumes the same amount of water as native forests. In addition, they also present higher biological efficiency when compared to other agricultural cultivations, in other words, they produce more from less resources. For example, 2 thousand liters of water are needed in order to produce one kilogram of potatoes, one kilogram of corn requires one thousand liters, one kilogram of cerrado wood demands 2,500 liters, but one kilogram of eucalypt wood only requires 350 liters of water.

Researches have also proven that most of the consumed water during eucalypt growth comes from the superficial layer of the soil. In line with current technological developments, practically all reforestations are made with cloned saplings, which, besides generating more productive and uniform plantations, also make them environmentally correct, since they do not possess pivoting roots, that is, roots that do not exceed 2.5 meters in depth and do not reach water tables, which are mostly located at greater depths.

Eucalypt and the Soil

Eucalypt is a significant biomass source, providing nutrients that are incorporated and recycled via the soil, water and plant cycle. According to several scientific studies, fallen leaves, branches and bark replace part of the nutrients consumed by the wood. Eucalypt culture also has a positive impact in areas which demand long term recovery and is often combined with native species for this purpose.

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